March 2011 Jobs Report and Wages

Here are the job market and compensation numbers for March 2011 (based on the job report):


Net gain
of 216,000 jobs in the month

  • Analysts expected an overall gain of 192,000
  • Private sector payrolls increased by 230,000
    • Private service producing industries added 199,000 (152,000 last month)
    • Goods producing industries gained 31,000 (70,000 last month)


  • February was revised to a gain of 194,000 from an original reading of 192,000
  • January was revised to a gain of 68,000 from a revision of 63,000 and an original reading of a 36,000 gain
  • Payroll processor ADP reported an employment gain of 201,000 jobs
    • 49% of the 208,000 ADP reported gain came from small business (firms with less than 50 employees). It was 46% last month
    • The last four months average an increase of 211,000 jobs. The prior four months saw an average increase of 74,000 jobs


  • 6.1 million people have been jobless for more than 6 months (long term
    unemployed) – up from 6.0 million last month
    and down from 6.5 million in March 2010

    • 45.5% of the unemployed
      are long term unemployed

  • Employers
    announced plans to cut 41,528 jobs in March. It was 50,702 jobs in February and 57,724 in March 2010

Unemployment rate dropped to 8.8%

  • Analysts predicted it would remain at 8.9%
  • Since November 2010 the unemployment rate has dropped 1%
  • The labor force
    participation rate is 64.2% (66.5% is average to good) – unchanged
  • The employment to population ratio is 58.5% – up from 58.4%
  • The
    U-6
    report, which is a broader group to count (workers who are part
    time but want to be full time and discouraged worker), dropped to 15.7% from 15.9% last month and from 16.7% in December 2010
  • PMI,
    a measure of manufacturing pace, is 61.2% and the 22th consecutive
    month of readings over 50 percent. Anything above 50% means the
    machines are running
  • Service
    sector activity dropped to 57.3%, down from 59.7% last month. An unexpected drop when compared to other improvements. It was the
    16th straight month of growth

Specific Segment Job numbers:

  • Manufacturing gained 17,000 jobs
  • Construction lost 1,000 jobs
  • Retailers lost 17,700 jobs
  • Leisure and Hospitality Services gained 37,000 jobs
  • Government sector lost 14,000, all state or local
  • Education and Health Services grew by 45,000 jobs
    • Health Care and Social Assistance grew by 44,500

  • Professional and Business Services grew by 78,000
    • 28,800 jobs gained in Temporary Help

Wage (can be revised):

  • The
    average weekly paycheck (seasonally
    adjusted) is $648.48 –
  • The average hourly earning (seasonally adjusted) is $19.30 – down 2 cents from last month
  • Average
    weekly hours and overtime of production and nonsupervisory employees on
    private nonfarm payrolls by industry sector, seasonally adjusted is
    33.6 hours, up slightly from 33.5 last month and 33.4 in January 2011
  • 6.3% of hourly-paid workers in Pennsylvania earned the minimum wage or less in 2010
  • 9.5% of hourly-paid workers in Texas earned the minimum wage or less in 2010

Bureau of Labor Statistics

The March 2011 Silicon Valley Positive Outlook Update

The focus of my last post was on whether or not I believe Silicon Valley has inflated like a 1999 bubble. I don’t think it has, but the stock valuations are still pretty high. If I were to guess, I’d say the apparent investment upswing is a byproduct of cash sitting on the sidelines. Investors have it and big companies have it. Investors plant the seeds and companies like Google buy the fruit at the first sign of flowering.

Silicon Valley is an interesting place though. Many of the companies there don’t want to be viewed as uncool. Once that happens it means a particular culture has set in. Which of these companies seem more exciting: Facebook or Yahoo? Google or Microsoft? You get the picture.

Earlier this week there was an article on cnn.com in the Tech section about the hiring on Silicon Valley. Here are some quotes and stats from the article “Silicon Valley experiencing new hiring boom” by Dan Simon:

  • Silicon Valley: 10.6% unemployment rate
  • Last month’s (March 2011) national average was 8.8%
  • Silicon Valley produced 1,200 jobs last month and expected to add thousands more in 2011.
  • According to SimplyHired.com, a search engine for job listings:
    • nearly 40% of 130,000 open positions in Silicon Valley are for software engineers
    • Since July of 2009 there’s been a 245% increase in openings that have “Facebook” as a keyword
    • Over the same time period, a 421% increase in “Twitter” job postings
  • Innovations in social media, mobile and cloud computing are driving the growth, said Dion Lim, SimplyHired’s president.
  • LinkedIn, the social-networking site for professionals, hired nearly 500 workers last year — almost doubling its workforce.
  • “As we grow the company, we’re always on the lookout for top talent,” said Jeff Weiner, LinkedIn’s CEO.

Teacher Pay and Motivation: What is Fair?

There are a lot of people hurting as this recession drags on. At least six million people have been without a job for more than six months. There’s anger.

And there’s resentment. Currently teachers are the target and it means a review of their total compensation. Pay, health benefits, pension, time off, and tenure are all seen as unfair in the face of the constant rhetoric of how US students are falling behind on international test scores. Logic says: poor test scores = poor performance = a loss of jobs. If you’re one of the six million people without a job that’s the bitter pill you’ve swallowed.

Although the focus is often on teacher pay, I don’t think that’s the case. The real angst is for tenure. And teaching is one profession that I don’t feel like pay is as important as it is in other industries. The sparkle in a kid’s eye as they figure out multiplication is the seminal motivator of most good teacher.

I’ve stated in other posts that I feel tests are over utilized as a measurement for teachers. Tests should be used to reinforce weak areas for kids development, but it should be coupled with something that kids produce. Creating something involves many more levels of learning, whether it’s creativity and problem solving or math and engineering, and that should be used to judge teachers.

Below is an interesting 60 Minutes report that highlights pay as a performance element for teachers:

http://cnettv.cnet.com/av/video/cbsnews/atlantis2/cbsnews_player_embed.swf

February 2011 Jobs Report and Wages

Here are the job market and compensation numbers for February 2011 (based on the job report):


Net gain
of 192,000 jobs in the month
(Revised in March to a gain of 194,000)

  • Analysts expected an overall gain of 190,000
  • Private sector payrolls increased by 220,000
    • Private service producing industries added 152,000
    • Goods producing industries gained 70,000


  • December was revised to a gain of 152,000 from a revision of 121,000 and an original reading of 103,000
  • January was revised to a gain of 68,000 from a revision of 63,000 and an original reading of 36,000 gain
  • Payroll processor ADP reported an employment gain of 217,000 jobs
    • 46% of the 217,000 came from small business (firms with less than 50 employees)


  • 6.0 million people have been jobless for more than 6 months (long term
    unemployed) – down from 6.2 million last month
    and 6.4 two months ago

    • 43.9% of the unemployed are long term unemployed – up from 43.8% last month (the overall population count has changed resulting in one number improving positively, but another appearing to be negative compared to last month)
  • Employers
    announced plans to cut 50,702 jobs in February, a subdued number but a year over year increase (42,090 in Feb 2010)

Unemployment rate dropped to 8.9%

  • Analysts predicted it would rise to 9.1%
  • The unemployment rate dipped below 9.0% for the first time 21 months
  • Last month there was an oddity of a low increase in jobs but a large drop in unemployment rate. After further inspection this is the result of an unusual squeeze of the components to this equation Number of people in the workforce (civilian labor force) – number of people with jobs (employed) = number of unemployed people.
    • The civilian labor force shrunk a little more than a normal drop with people dropping out of the labor force and the number of people with jobs increased a touch resulting in a significant drop in the unemployment rate
    • The “Not in Labor Force” number rose by 2.4 million people from February 2010 to February 2011

  • The labor force
    participation rate is 64.2% (66.5% is average to good) – unchanged
  • The employment to population ratio is 58.4% – unchanged
  • The
    U-6
    report, which is a broader group to count (workers who are part
    time but want to be full time and discouraged worker), dropped to 15.9% from 16.1%.
  • PMI,
    a measure of manufacturing pace, is 61.4% and the 21th consecutive
    month of readings over 50 percent. Anything above 50% means the
    machines are running
  • Service
    sector activity rose to 59.7%, up from 59.4% last month. It was the
    15th straight month of growth

Specific Segment Job numbers:

  • Manufacturing gained 33,000 jobs
  • Construction gained 33,000 jobs (lost 32,000 so an even start to the year)
  • Retailers lost 8,100 jobs
  • Leisure and Hospitality Services gained 21,000 jobs
  • Government sector lost 30,000, all state or local
  • Education and Health Services grew by 40,000 jobs
    • Health Care and Social Assistance grew by 36,200

  • Professional and Business Services grew by 47,000
    • 15,500 jobs gained in Temporary Help (lost jobs last month after several months of gains)

Wage (can be revised):

  • The average weekly paycheck (seasonally adjusted) is $647.56 – an increase of $1.94 and a $3.35 positive change from December, 2010. $19.08 gain in the last year (there’s been low inflation so this is good)
  • The average hourly earning (seasonally adjusted) is $19.33 – flat from last month
  • Average
    weekly hours and overtime of production and nonsupervisory employees on
    private nonfarm payrolls by industry sector, seasonally adjusted is
    33.5 hours, up slightly from 33.4

Bureau of Labor Statistics

A Dan Pink Speaking Experience

A couple of weeks ago I was staring at my computer screen and in comes an Instant Message asking if I knew Dan Pink was speaking in Charlotte? The IM was from Jill, a work friend for over 10 years. I had no idea about the event, but I was excited. She sent me the link to the UNCC NEXT Speaker Series and I promptly bought a $40 ticket.

The day of the event arrived, but I wasn’t sure where to go. The Blumenthal has several stages and the one I was looking for was the Booth Playhouse. Luckily, there was an event before hand for networking, so I figured I could follow the crowd. It was easy. There were several people standing in the hall welcoming Dan Pink fans and pointing to will call for picking up tickets. I was in extrovert mode and introduced myself to several other attendees, but the response I got was uncomfortable friendliness, forced smiles and all. After a few of these interactions, I realized the people I was trying to chat up were college professors. Maybe they aren’t used to networking in a real business world? Undaunted, I bought a beer and spotted someone who wasn’t part of the school clique. I introduced myself to Darren and we discussed Pink’s books.

Although we are standing in the lobby of a small theatre, it sort of feels like a post modern fashion store. There are doors at the ends, but the entire area is visible through clear windows. I wasn’t at the mall, but I could have sworn I saw some t-shirts on sale for $250. Thankfully, Jill arrived and we discussed our day of work.

We decided to head in early to get a good seat. I heard it was interactive so I wanted to be near the front. However, when we walked in I was very stunned to see the first eight rows or so were reserved for VIPs. It isn’t a big venue so this preferential seating situation was a bit much. For $40 I should be able to sit close.

I met another friend as we were deciding where to sit. My inner voice was screaming “yea!” that this friend showed up. There’s always a rewarding feeling when someone else tries out music, a book, or a restaurant you suggested and this was the same appreciation.

The lights dimmed and the last few seats were taken. I noticed Peter Gorman, the Superintendent of the Charlotte-Mechklenberg schools, sitting across from us – not a VIP either. I’m not sure who kicked it off. It was either the Chanceller or the President of UNCC. He was kind of funny. The Dean of the Business School then introduced Dan to the audience.

I’ve viewed most of the videos for Drive and was nervous that Dan would stick to the script. He mostly followed the themes but he certainly was able to ad lib. He did his homework and talked about the local area some. He quizzed the audience about motivation and interacted with a few different guests. Throughout the session some slides were used to highlight the research that reinforced his points. Time flew by and it felt like it was short, but he spoke for about 70 min.

Overall, I enjoyed my first Dan Pink speaker series. I went with friends and made some connections. Next time I’m going to penetrate the inner circle though 🙂

Working Thoughts 2/10/09
Sustaining Large Economic Growth is Key for the US

January 2011 Jobs Report and Wages

Here are the job market and compensation numbers for January 2011 (based on the job report):


Net gain
of 36,000 jobs in the month
(revised in March to a gain of 68,000)

  • Analysts expected an overall gain of 149,000
  • Private sector payrolls increased by 50,000
    • Private service producing industries added 32,000
    • Goods producing industries gained 18,000


  • December was revised to a gain of 152,000 from a revision of 121,000 and from an original reading of 103,000
  • November was revised to a gain of 93,000 from a revised reading of 71,000 and an original reading of 39,000 gain
  • October was revised to a gain of 171,000 from a second revision of 210,000 a revised reading of 172,000 and an original reading of 151,000
  • Payroll processor ADP reported an employment gain of 187,000 jobs (a revised 247,000 jobs in December, 2010)
    • The ADP survey and the Jobs Report survey aren’t usually this varying in their results, which, coupled with other data, makes people think the economy is shifting and the models used in the Government report are not currently effective

  • The Labor Department estimates there were 886,000 workers who had a job but couldn’t get to work due to weather (5th largest account of this situation) – if true, this means the real gain in jobs is estimated to be 200,000
  • 6.2 million people have been jobless for more than 6 months (long term
    unemployed) – down from 6.4 million last month

    • 43.8% of the unemployed are long term unemployed – down from 44.3% last month and up from 41.9% in November, 2010
  • Employers announced plans to cut 38,519 jobs in January, a 20% increase over December, according to outplacement consulting firm Challenger, Gray & Christmas. This is a really low number because it usually averages just over 100,000 for the month of January every year
  • Benchmark revisions were made for April 2009 to March of 2010 and show combined additional loss of 215,000 jobs during that period
  • Overall, it was a  confusing report – the numbers seem to contradict each other

Unemployment rate dropped to 9.0%

  • Analysts predicted it would rise to 9.5%
  • The 0.8% drop in a span of two months is rare: only 4 larger two month declines on record and those were in the 1940s and 1950s
  • The unemployment rate has been at 9% or higher for 21 months
  • Normally, when a decrease in the unemployment number happens without a very large number of new jobs it means people have dropped out of the count, but that isn’t the case this month – this is odd (504,000 people did drop out though)
  • The labor force
    participation rate is 64.2% (66.5% is average to good) – relatively unchanged
  • The employment to population ratio is 58.4% – relatively unchanged from 58.3% last month
  • The
    U-6
    report, which is a broader group to count (workers who are part
    time but want to be full time and discouraged worker), dropped to 16.1% from 16.7%.
    This reflects an even greater decrease seen in the overall unemployment rate (9.0% from 9.4%)
  • PMI,
    a measure of manufacturing pace, is 57% and the 20th consecutive
    month of readings over 50 percent. Anything above 50% means the
    machines are running
  • Service sector activity rose to 59.4%, up from 57.1% last month. It was the 14th straight month of growth and the highest reading since August 2005
  • 2010 fourth quarter productivity is reported at 2.6% and annualized at 3.6%

Specific Segment Job numbers:

  • Manufacturing gained 49,000 jobs
  • Construction lost 32,000 jobs
  • Retailers gained 27,500 jobs
  • Leisure and Hospitality Services lost 3,000 jobs
  • Government sector lost 14,000, Federal lost 2,000
  • Education and Health Services grew by 13,000 jobs
    • Health Care and Social Assistance grew by 12,900

  • Professional and Business Services grew by 31,000
    • 11,400 jobs lost in Temporary Help (had been gaining for several months)

Wage (can be revised):

  • The average weekly paycheck (seasonally adjusted) is $645.96 – an increase of $1.42
  • The average hourly earning (seasonally adjusted) is $19.34
  • Average
    weekly hours and overtime of production and nonsupervisory employees on
    private nonfarm payrolls by industry sector, seasonally adjusted is
    33.4 hours

Bureau of Labor Statistics

Job Report Stats Summary

An Interview with Dan Pink and the NEXT Speaker Series

Perhaps I’m just now noticing it but over the last 5 years there’s been what I consider an upswing in speaking series, notably around new ways to think and perceive our world. A local college in Charlotte – University of North Carolina in Charlotte – has a program going called NEXT in the Belk School of Business. Dan Pink is speaking tomorrow night (February 1st, 2011) and I’m excited about attending it.

I’ve featured Dan Pink throughout this blog and figured I’d email him some questions. Below is our exchange plus links to his books and a video with Oprah.


1) You’re currently doing a speaking tour – sharing ideas and promoting your books. Does the repetition of this ever sap your enthusiasm for it?



Airport security lines sap my enthusiasm. Big time. As does bad food and lack of exercise on the road. But the conversations with people never get old. Folks seem extremely engaged in this set of ideas — and they’re always showing me new practices or new ways to look at the topic. That’s what keeps me going.




2) Clay Shirky and others have recently highlighted a change in how people spend their time. He calls it the Cognitive Surplus. It’s the observation of people spending less time watching TV and more time creating something, whether its an update to Wikipedia or a dance video on youtube. These themes tend to run throughout your books as well. What are your thoughts on this situation? Is it good or bad that math and science scores are down, but evil squirrel videos are up?




Cognitive surplus is a fascinating idea. And if even a fraction of it goes for noble, interesting pursuits, that can be a game-changer. Wikipedia is a good case in point.  That said, some people will always squander their time.  Today, though, there are many more options for people to use time in (slightly) more creative and ennobled ways.  As for math and science scores, I give evil squirrels a pass on this one. The real problem is that we’ve got an 19th century education system that’s designed mostly for the convenience of adults rather than the education of children.




3) Since publishing Drive, I bet many people have told you about how they instituted ROWE or 20% time. For instance Michael Lebowitz of Big Spaceship in the NY Times mentioned Intellectual Property Fridays. A few hours where they brainstorm very simple ideas and see which ones to run with. Can you share one or two that stuck out to you?




There are lots of examples – and they’re all pretty cool. For instance, I heard about Intuit doing 10 percent time — with terrific results. The head of innovation there, Roy Rosin, told me: “After our CEO declared ‘mobile’ was key to our strategy, none of our business units were able to change direction on a dime, but our employees using 10 percent time create seven mobile apps before any other mobile projects even got started.” What’s also cool is that several schools have begun holding “FedEx Days” — both for teachers and for students.




4) How are your books received in other countries? I imagine many of the concepts in Drive are scoffed at in China or the ideas of A Whole New Mind are “duhs” in Europe.




Both of those books have done surprisingly well overseas — especially in Japan, South Korea, and Brazil.  In Europe, A WHOLE NEW MIND did pretty well — but DRIVE has done much better.  In general, though, the curious reaction to both baskets of ideas — anywhere in the world — is similar. People say, “I’m a right-brainer. I’m motivated internally. That’s how I want the rest of the workplace to be.”