November 2010 Jobs Report and Wages

Here are the job market and compensation numbers for November 2010 (based on the job report):


Net gain
of 39,000 jobs in the month

  • Private sector payrolls increased by 50,000
    • Down from 160,000 last month
    • Worst performance in 10 months

  • Analysts expected an overall gain of 150,000
  • September was revised to a loss of 24,000 jobs from an original reading of 95,000 lost and a revised loss of 41,000
  • October was revised to a gain of 172,000 from an original reading of 151,000
  • The revisions for August, September, and October added 145,000 jobs to the economy
  • 6.1
    million people have been jobless for more than 6 months (long term
    unemployed) – virtually unchanged from August, September, and October

    • 41.9% of the unemployed are long term unemployed – inched up from 41.8% last month and 41.7% the month before
  • The main type of hire was for Temporary Help Service (+40,000) and since September of 2009 this employment has improved by 494,000
    • Its normally an indicator of an improving economic cycle, but a year of it indicates uncertain business conditions

  • Job Openings and Labor Turnover Survey (JOLTS), shows that job openings increased by 351,000 in October
  • The total number of job openings in October was 3.4 million, while the total number of unemployed workers was 14.8 million
  • The ratio of unemployed workers to job openings improved to 4.4-to-1 in October

Unemployment rate went up to 9.8%

  • Analysts predicted it would be 9.6%
  • The unemployment rate has been over 9% for 19 months – the longest such streak since the early ’80s
  • The employment to population ratio is 58.2% – relatively unchanged
  • The
    U-6 report, which is a broader group to count (workers who are part
    time but want to be full time and discouraged worker), stayed at 17.0%. This indicates the increase of the unemployment rate to 9.8% is a reflection of more people actively looking for jobs in November (these individuals are only counted if they are actively looking)
  • The unemployment rate for those with a college education is 5.1%
    • Highest in 40 years

  • PMI,
    a measure of manufacturing pace, is 56.6% and the 19th consecutive
    month of readings over 50 percent. Anything above 50% means the
    machines are running
  • Productivity, measured for the quarter, showed tepid growth of 2.3%

Specific Segment Job numbers:

  • Manufacturing lost 13,000 jobs
  • Construction lost 5,000 jobs
  • Retailers lost 28,100 jobs
  • Leisure and Hospitality Services gained 11,000 jobs
  • Government sector lost 11,000, Federal gained 2,000
  • Education and Health Services grew by 30,000 jobs
    • Health Care and Social Assistance grew by 34,000

  • Professional and Business Services grew by 53,000
    • 39.500 jobs added in Temporary Help

Wage (can be revised):

  • The average weekly paycheck (seasonally adjusted) is $642.87 – a decrease of $1.91
  • The average hourly earning (seasonally adjusted) is $19.19
  • Average
    weekly hours and overtime of production and nonsupervisory employees on
    private nonfarm payrolls by industry sector, seasonally adjusted is
    33.5 hours

Bureau of Labor Statistics

Job Report Stats Summary

About benleeson
My name is Ben Leeson. I currently work for a large financial company in IT. I went to school at Marist College in Poughkeepsie, NY. I graduated with a B.S. in Business Administration concentrating in HR. Professor William Brown taught me and I enjoyed his classes; even acquiring an appreciation for just about all things HR. I didn’t pursue a job in that field after college but I’ve kept up with it. This blog will further my fascination with all things HR. I hope to grow my knowledge of the area through thoughtful writings and spirited feedback. I will attempt to have a fairly routine style so anyone reading can come to expect certain segments. Please excuse my incorrect grammar and occasional misspelling.

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