Using a Math Equation to Push for Change

I’ve been thinking about math a lot lately, especially as it pertains to business. I ran across one simple equation in Alan Webber’s Rules of Thumb: 52 Truths for Winning at Business Without Losing Your Self that I really liked (I’ll do a review of it at some point). It is:

C(SQ)>R(c)

which can be read as the Cost of maintaining the Status Quo is greater than the Risk of the change. Basically, nothing is getting done unless this formula can be proven. Sometimes the left side is drastically increased through events like mergers and sometimes the risk of a change is tempered by preparation practices like having standards in place. Either way, it’s important to get your company management to see this equation. And the more lopsided it is, the better.

Working Thoughts 06/18/09
Electronic Medical Records Domino

About benleeson
My name is Ben Leeson. I currently work for a large financial company in IT. I went to school at Marist College in Poughkeepsie, NY. I graduated with a B.S. in Business Administration concentrating in HR. Professor William Brown taught me and I enjoyed his classes; even acquiring an appreciation for just about all things HR. I didn’t pursue a job in that field after college but I’ve kept up with it. This blog will further my fascination with all things HR. I hope to grow my knowledge of the area through thoughtful writings and spirited feedback. I will attempt to have a fairly routine style so anyone reading can come to expect certain segments. Please excuse my incorrect grammar and occasional misspelling.

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