For Some People Climbing the Corporate Ladder is the Goal

Some people like their job so much that they don’t look for other jobs. A good example of these people are teachers. But these same people exist in the corporate world as well. There is something to be said for doing a good job and going home around 5:00.

But for some people climbing the corporate ladder is the goal. MSN Careers ran a story called 10 Reasons You aren’t Getting Promoted. Tag and Catherine Goulet, FabJob.com wrote it and it is very succinct. Here are a few:

Promotion Killer No. 1: You’re a slacker
So
what if you sometimes arrive late to work, are the first one out the
door at the end of the day, and tend to call in sick on Mondays and
Fridays? And it’s not your fault you’ve missed a few deadlines — you
had computer trouble… the instructions weren’t clear… you didn’t
get the help you needed… (insert most recent excuse here)…

 
Promotion Killer No. 2: You’re doing “fine”
You’re
no slacker. You show up on time and do a fair day’s work for a fair
day’s pay. And that’s the problem. Doing work that is “fair,” “OK,”
“adequate,” “acceptable” or “fine” may be enough to keep a job, but
it’s usually not enough to be promoted to a job with more
responsibility. If you don’t go the extra mile for your employer, don’t
be surprised if your employer doesn’t go the extra mile for you.

 
Promotion Killer No. 3: You’re not visible enough
It’s
not enough to do a good job; people need to know you have leadership
potential. So do what you can to get noticed by the people who have the
power to promote you. When something you’ve worked on goes
exceptionally well, write a memo to management praising the team you
worked with. You’ll get your name out there and be seen as a leader.
Make sure you’re visible in other ways too, such as volunteering to
lead committees, contributing articles to the employee newsletter,
coaching the softball team or chairing a volunteer project in your
company. You can help your company, your community and your career at
the same time.


Promotion Killer No. 4: You’re a difficult person

Promotion Killer No. 5: You haven’t mastered the job you’re in

Promotion Killer No. 6: Your boss needs you in the job you’re in

Promotion Killer No. 7: You don’t have the right image

Promotion Killer No. 8: You have enemies

Promotion Killer No. 9: You’re competing with superstars
In
some industries the reality is that there are far more star employees
than positions at the top. If you’re in a highly competitive career,
you’ll need to do an extraordinary job instead of merely an excellent
one. Also, be prepared to do more of the other things mentioned in this
article to stand out in the crowd and show that you’re management
material.
 
Promotion Killer No. 10: Your company isn’t in a position to promote you
If
you work for a company with a tight budget or low turnover,
opportunities to move up may be limited. If a bigger paycheck isn’t a
possibility, consider asking your boss to acknowledge your work in
other ways. For example, a new job title might cost the company nothing
more than new business cards, or you may be able to get other benefits
such as access to a company parking spot, a larger workspace, a day
off, a mentor, educational opportunities or other perks. Be creative
and ask for what you want. You might be pleasantly surprised with the
result.

 

About benleeson
My name is Ben Leeson. I currently work for a large financial company in IT. I went to school at Marist College in Poughkeepsie, NY. I graduated with a B.S. in Business Administration concentrating in HR. Professor William Brown taught me and I enjoyed his classes; even acquiring an appreciation for just about all things HR. I didn’t pursue a job in that field after college but I’ve kept up with it. This blog will further my fascination with all things HR. I hope to grow my knowledge of the area through thoughtful writings and spirited feedback. I will attempt to have a fairly routine style so anyone reading can come to expect certain segments. Please excuse my incorrect grammar and occasional misspelling.

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out /  Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out /  Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out /  Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out /  Change )

Connecting to %s

%d bloggers like this: